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Monthly Archives: August 2012

ill just leave this here

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This year’s Graduate Studies Program (GSP) at Singularity University — the learning institution focused on future-shaping technologies — is wrapping up an intense 10-week summer. To celebrate, an expo event, including the Closing Ceremony, was held at the Computer History Museum. The GSP is the biggest program that the University runs every year, filtering through over 3,000 applications to identify 80 students tasked with impacting the lives of a billion people in the next 10 years along eight grand challenges: education, global health, energy, environment, food, water, security, and poverty.
Over the last few weeks, students broke up into 21 teams and presented their ideas aimed at nothing short of changing the world. The presentations came in a rapid-fire format to a standing-room only audience, and it was impressive how the teams distilled their passions into viable proposals that often tackled multiple grand challenges at once. Although not all of the ideas are ready to hit the ground running, SU fully expects that many of them will turn into full fledged companies over the next year.


Google’s Director of New Projects speaks to Singularity University’s student teams on creating a culture of innovation, and how “common sense” is often at odds with creating this culture.


“its like a laser printer for dna”

http://www.genomecompiler.com/
Creating tools that enable the design and creation of useful living things, and more.

http://cambriangenomics.com/


Mission team members for InSight, the new Mars lander mission selected by NASA to launch in 2016, explain how the spacecraft will advance our knowledge of Mars’ history and rocky planet evolution.

“It’s time to dedicate your lives towards solving one of the worlds greatest challenges, and if you’re not it’s time to reorient yourself towards that goal.”


things that inspire you, they change your life


One of the landmark events of 20th century science was celebrated and reinterpreted for the 21st century in Trinity College Dublin on 12 July 2012 as part of the Science in the City programme of ESOF2012. Dr Craig Venter, one of the leaders of the Human Genome Project in the 1990s and a pioneer of synthetic biology delivered a lecture entitled, ‘What is Life? A 21st century perspective’ recreating the Irish event that inspired the discovery of the structure of DNA.

In February, 1943 one of the most distinguished scientists of the 20th Century, Erwin Schrödinger, delivered a seminal lecture, entitled ‘What is Life?’, under the auspices of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, in Trinity College Dublin. The lecture presented far-sighted ideas on how hereditary information could be encoded in a chemical structure (aperiodic crystal) in living cells. Schrödinger’s book (1944) of the same title is considered to be a scientific classic. The book was cited by Crick and Watson as one of the inspirations which ultimately led them to unravel the structure of DNA in 1953, a breakthrough which won them the Nobel prize.

seems a man is indeed a bridge as Nietzsche says. life is just passing the code down the matrix :> Craig Venter is like Morpheus, so cool :>


Every time nerdchills all over my back :>